Blogs

Japanese team combines technology with centuries-old game to reinvent chess for a cyberpunk era

Japanese team combines technology with centuries-old game to reinvent chess for a cyberpunk era

With all its complexities and long history, chess is unquestionably a regal game, but it hasn’t really changed that much over time. The basic rules have remained steadfast, which is actually kind of great if you’re looking to compare games past and present. But what if someone took modern technology and applied it to this hallowed game?What would it be like?

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Chess Is Being Forever Changed by Technology

Chess Is Being Forever Changed by Technology

Since its origins in 600 A.D., chess has truly proven to be a timeless game. What started in India as a war game called Chatarung, evolved throughout the centuries.Anything that lasts 1500 years has a tendency to pick up traits directly related to the eras in which its weathered. For instance, the NBA wasn’t always the fitted suit, patterned bow tie, faux-glasses league it is today. The 1970’s offered large collars, heavily patterned suits, and lush fur coats .

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Technology is helping people cheat at chess—and helping tournaments catch them

Technology is helping people cheat at chess—and helping tournaments catch them

When mediocre chess player entered Italy’s prestigious International Chess Festival of Imperia, was ranked 51,366th in the world.They never stood up, always sat with arms folded and thumb under armpit, and blinked constantly and unnaturally. When festival officials inspected, they discovered that pendent was a video camera and that concealing a Morse code box connected to a computer that was either running a chess program or being monitored by an accomplice.

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Machine teaches itself chess in 24 hours, attains international master level without being told the rules

Machine teaches itself chess in 24 hours, attains international master level without being told the rules

A student has built a computer that managed to teach itself chess, and in just three days attained a level of skill comparable with some of the world’s most skilful players.In the last two decades computers have become exponentially more powerful, but the “brute force” method of evaluating 200 million moves per second that Deep Blue employed was still the norm.Caissa instead trained a “neural network” using example situations from real games of chess.Rather than searching through all possible future moves and calculating the best one.

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